Could Food Be a New Medicine to Fight Heart Disease?

Cleveland HeartLab diet, heart attack and stroke, metabolic syndrome

A compound called DMB (3,3-dimethyl-1-butanol), found in olive oil, red wine and other foods, may someday be a first-of-its kind drug with the potential to treat—or even prevent—heart disease in the future, suggests a new Cleveland Clinic study published in the journal Cell. The investigators report that in mice, dietary supplementation with this naturally occurring compound safely inhibited atherosclerosis (plaque more »

3 New Tests to Predict Heart Attack and Stroke Risk

Cleveland HeartLab biomarkers, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, TMAO

Three new blood tests can help identify hidden risk for a heart attack or stroke in seemingly healthy patients—before symptoms strike. The new tests, now available through Cleveland HeartLab (CHL), check levels of certain biomarkers that have been linked to cardiovascular danger in peer-reviewed studies. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading killer of men and women, accounting for one in more »

The Hidden Disease That Triples Heart Attack Risk

Cleveland HeartLab diabetes, heart attack and stroke, metabolic syndrome

It’s extremely common for people to be diagnosed with diabetes soon after they’ve suffered a heart attack, according to a new study presented at the American Heart Association’s (AHA) 2015 Scientific Sessions. Patients often chalk this double whammy up to bad luck, believing that they were inexplicably hit with two unrelated conditions at once. In reality, having diabetes–particularly if it’s more »

Dangerous Cluster of Heart Disease & Diabetes Risks Affects 35% of Americans

Cleveland HeartLab diabetes, inflammation, metabolic syndrome

More than one in three US adults have metabolic syndrome, a combination of at least three of five pre-disease-state factors, that doubles risk for heart disease and quintuples the risk for type 2 diabetes, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.  The study reported that from 2003-2004 to 2011-2012, overall rates of metabolic syndrome more »