Familial Hypercholesterolemia:
The Hidden Cholesterol Condition

Cleveland HeartLab cholesterol, heart attack and stroke

September is National Cholesterol Education Month—a reminder to get a cholesterol check and learn ways to reduce high levels in order to prevent heart attacks and strokes. It’s also a good time to highlight a harmful lipid condition that often goes undiagnosed and unnoticed until disaster strikes. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an inherited disorder that leads to early and aggressive more »

Preventing Heart Failure

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Some 5.7 million adults in the United States have heart failure, which happens when the heart cannot pump enough blood and oxygen to support other organs in the body. People with heart failure experience symptoms that significantly impact their quality of life, such as shortness of breath during the activities of daily life and general fatigue and weakness, as their hearts more »

A New Eating Peril: The Social-Business Diet

Cleveland HeartLab biomarkers, cholesterol, diabetes, diet, heart attack and stroke, lifestyle habits

When it comes to our eating habits, it doesn’t get much grimmer than the Western diet. High in fat, red and processed meats, salt, and sugar and low in healthful plant foods, it’s the predominant eating pattern in the U.S.—and increasingly in other parts of the world—and solidly linked to heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and other chronic conditions. But recently more »

Questioning the HDL Hypothesis

Cleveland HeartLab cholesterol, heart attack and stroke, lifestyle habits

For decades, the relationship between cholesterol and heart health seemed to be black and white: High levels of “bad” or “lousy” LDL cholesterol raised the risk for heart disease. High levels of “good” HDL or “healthy” cholesterol reduced it by removing cholesterol from artery walls. The belief has been so solid that doctors routinely prescribed drugs like niacin to help more »

4 Things I Wish I’d Known Before My Heart Attack: A Doctor’s Story

Cleveland HeartLab biomarkers, cholesterol, heart attack and stroke

Doug Dunning, MD thought he was healthy – until he suffered a heart attack on June 15, 2015, at age 56. He is now convinced that it might have been prevented with the right knowledge, testing, and optimal medical care. “This experience has changed how I practice medicine, making me a more attentive advocate for my patients’ cardiovascular wellness – and my more »

3 New Tests to Predict Heart Attack and Stroke Risk

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Three new blood tests can help identify hidden risk for a heart attack or stroke in seemingly healthy patients—before symptoms strike. The new tests, now available through Cleveland HeartLab (CHL), check levels of certain biomarkers that have been linked to cardiovascular danger in peer-reviewed studies. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading killer of men and women, accounting for one in more »

TMAO Testing: A New Way To Assess Heart Attack And Stroke Risk

Cleveland HeartLab biomarkers, heart attack and stroke, TMAO

A new blood test that measures levels of TMAO (trimethylamine-N-oxide) — a metabolite derived from gut bacteria — can powerfully predict future risk for heart attack, stroke, and death in patients who appear otherwise healthy, according to pioneering Cleveland Clinic research. The new test — now available through Cleveland HeartLab — measures blood levels of TMAO, a compound produced by more »

The Diet that Helps Prevent Heart Attack, Stroke and Inflammation

Cleveland HeartLab biomarkers, blood pressure, cholesterol, diet, inflammation

Even if you’re not overweight, cutting calories could lower inflammation by nearly 50 percent, improve other major risk factors for heart attack and stroke, including blood pressure and cholesterol, and even add years to your life, suggests a new National Institute on Aging (NIA) study. The findings, which were published in Journal of Gerontology: Medical Science, “are quite intriguing,” said more »

Triglycerides May Predict Risk For Repeat Heart Attacks

Cleveland HeartLab biomarkers, cholesterol, heart attack and stroke, vitamins and supplements

Survivors of heart attacks and other acute coronary events are up to 61 percent more likely to suffer repeat events if they have high fasting triglycerides, according to new research published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC).  The investigators examined outcomes in two studies of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS): sudden blockage of blood flow more »

4 Delicious Superfoods That Are Good For The Heart

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It sounds too good to be true, but a variety of tasty treats – including nuts, berries, and even dark chocolate – help protect against cardiovascular disease, according to new research. Here is a look at some of the latest discoveries about which foods are the most beneficial. Peanuts may help prevent heart disease. Eating peanuts may protect against fatal cardiovascular more »

3 Surprising Myths About Cholesterol

Cleveland HeartLab cholesterol, heart attack and stroke, inflammation

Cholesterol is the most demonized, misunderstood and controversial substance in both our bodies and our diets. New and recent cholesterol guidelines, in particular, have sparked headlines and hot medical debate about its role in heart disease. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) ignited fresh controversy this month by suggesting that cholesterol-rich foods–such as eggs, shellfish and liver–may not be a more »

The Great Debate About Cholesterol Guidelines

Cleveland HeartLab cholesterol, heart attack and stroke

The 2013 American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) cholesterol guidelines sparked headlines and hot medical debate around the world, says Marc Penn, MD, PhD, FACC, Co-Founder and Chief Medical Officer of Cleveland HeartLab and Director of Research of Summa Cardiovascular Institute. “Nearly a year later, there’s still widespread confusion about what clinicians should do with such dramatically changed guidelines more »